International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning (iJET), Vol. 1, No. 1 (2006)

Auer, Michael (Editor)

Mit Beiträgen von Al-Zoubi, Abdullah Yusuf / Auer, Michael / Balmus, Nicolae / Bosnić, Ivana / Dumbraveanu, Roza / Fraz Wyne, Mudasser / Giretti, Alberto / Hedin, Björn Olof / Henze, Nicola / Karlsson, Göran / Leo, Tommaso / McPhee, Duncan / Sammour, George Nicola / Smyth, Gerard / Thomas, Nathan / Thomas, Paula / Viola, Silvia Rita / Ware, Mark / Žagar, Mario / Žagar, Martin

kassel university press, ISSN: 1863-0383, 2006
(International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning Heft No. 1, Vol. 1)

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Content: The iJET journal aims to focus on the exchange of relevant trends and research results as well as the presentation of practical experiences gained while developing and testing elements of technology enhanced learning.

The International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning (iJET) is an Open Access Journal

Table of Content

Auer, Michael:From the Editor

Guest Editorial
Al-Zoubi, Abdullah Yusuf:From the IMCL2006 Chair
Auer, Michael:IMCL200 Welcome

Papers
Henze, Nicola:Personalized E-Learning in the Semantic Web
Hedin, Björn Olof:Mobile Message Services Using Text, Audio or Video for Improving the Learning Infrastructure in Higher Education
Karlsson, Göran:Distance Tutoring in Mechanics
McPhee, Duncan /
Thomas, Nathan /
Thomas, Paula /
Ware, Mark /
Sammour, George Nicola:
Evaluating the Effectiveness of m-learning in the Teaching of Multi-media to First Year University Students
Smyth, Gerard:Wireless Technologies Bridging the Digital Divide in Education
Viola, Silvia Rita /
Giretti, Alberto /
Leo, Tommaso:
Exploring attitudes of learners with respect to different learning strategies and performances using statistical methods
Fraz Wyne, Mudasser:Challenge: A Multidisciplinary Degree Program in Bioinformatics
Žagar, Mario /
Bosnić, Ivana /
Žagar, Martin:
Distributed Digital Book

Short Papers
Dumbraveanu, Roza /
Balmus, Nicolae:
Using Learning Objects in Teaching Science